Click on the times below to read more about workshop speakers and descriptions.

Five Gifts of Pro-Aging:  Honoring Maturity in a Culture That Could Use It
Marcia Newman, MA, LMFT, Psychotherapist, Program Manager, Betty Ford Center Outpatient Services, Author, Five Gifts of Pro-Aging: Honoring Maturity in a Culture That Could Use It
This experiential workshop is designed for women (and any brave men who wish to attend). Marcia Newman will offer a fresh perspective and a much needed dialogue on the benefits of aging, in contrast to today’s anti-aging culture, which inundates women with messages about appraising our value by remaining youthful.  Newman will address generation-sensitive reasons for the increase in addictions among older women and provide five key gifts which promote new revolutionary roles for maturity and joyful living.

The Spirituality of Adherence
Fransing Daisy, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, The Northwest AIDS Education and Training Center; Elizabeth Gordon, MDiv, JD, PhD, Consultant, Therapeutic Aspects of Spirituality
When a client is experiencing a co-occurring disorder, adherence to a treatment plan is of primary importance. Structuring life with a chronic illness, chemical dependency, and/or mental health issues can be a burden and generally difficult. By incorporating three critical components of spirituality into the development of a therapeutic treatment plan can increase the likelihood of adherence. This workshop educates the audience on these components of spirituality using the Evidence Based Practices of Motivational Interviewing as well as Wellness and Recovery Action Plans (WRAP) to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

First Episode Psychosis and Early Intervention – Lessons Learned in Washington
Haley Lowe, MA, Program Administrator, Children and Adolescent Behavioral Health Unit; Tamara Sale, MA, Director, Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA)
This presentation will provide an overview of current knowledge about early psychosis intervention: direct experience, overview of the field and core practices, how it looks different and why it matters. Washington partnered with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance and Central Washington Comprehensive Mental Health to pilot New Journeys Early Intervention Program based in Yakima County, and will share lessons learned.

Recovery Yoga and It’s Application in Treatment Settings
Sandra Kozlowski, CDP, Y12SR Certified, RYT 200 Level; Jennifer Castaneto, Program Manager, Northwest Resources Inpatient Treatment
This workshop will be presenting how yoga has impacted inpatient treatment satisfaction.  Sandra is a CDP and certified yogi in 12 Step Recovery yoga as a RYT 200 level.

Motivational Interviewing in One Hour
David Jefferson, MSW, Community Health Analyst, Skagit County
Motivational interviewing is constantly changing and being shaped by research and practice. Learn the latest material published by Miller and Rollnick and other leading practitioners. Learn about the four phases of MI, the difference between sustain talk, change talk, and discord, and the importance of engagement to achieve better outcomes.

Treating the CD Patient with Mental Health Symptoms: A Hands On Approach for CD Counselors
Samantha Carroll, BA, CDP, The Healing Lodge; Cara Strange, CDP, Pioneer Center East
Chemical Dependency (CD) and mental health issues are often times indistinguishable, yet CD counselors must walk a fine line when treating these patients. This workshop offers some tools and techniques for treating patients with mental health issues in the CD setting without practicing out of our scope. It will also help the CD counselor gain confidence in our very important role in the ever changing health care system.

Working Effectively and Sensitively with LGBTIQ Clients
Mary Minten, MA, MFT, LCADC, CST, PhD Candidate, Oregon State University
We will have discussion and handouts on tools to help counselors in engage and treat individuals from the LGBTIQQAP community. These will include: new terms, why our sensitivity matters, the “how” of being sensitive, and tips on how to approach vulnerable topics (like sex, spirituality/religion, relationships, and gender transition). We will discuss techniques to help clients who are struggling with internalized homophobia and shame as well as how to help clients facing external discrimination and prejudice. We will briefly look the latest research about how gay, lesbian, and transgender clients see heterosexual and cisgender counselors – especially in light of how we can reduce the most common barriers and repair inevitable missteps. We will fit in the basics of co-occurring treatment – in particular for comorbid gender dysphoria and substance use concerns.

What You Should Know About Counseling LGBT Clients
Donnie Goodman, MA/NCC LMHP, Deputy Director, Seattle Counseling Service
This workshop will cover information that every clinician should know when working with the LGBTQ population. Such items include: assumptions and beliefs about being gay; homophobia, culturally sensitive words, safety both sexual and demographic, domestic violence and culturally sensitive words. Additionally, it will cover appropriate ways for you and your agency to be competent and inviting for LGBTQ clients.

Diagnosing Mental Disorders in Persons With Intellectual Disabilities and Other Developmental Disabilities
Edward Fischer, PsyD, Developmental Disability Administration, Department of Social and Health Services
The diagnostic issues involving diagnosing mental disorders in people with developmental disabilities.

Sexual Health in Recovery
Mary Minten, MA, MFT, LCADC, CST, PhD Candidate, Oregon State University
We will consider the research on how sexual wellness is critical for many of our clients for successful and long-term recovery. We will cover information on how alcohol and drug addiction impact sexual health, as well as steps we can take to help our clients find sexual health based in their values. We will look at importance and the challenges of re-establishing intimacy. Discussions and handouts will include tools to help us bring up and discuss sexual health, as counselors, with our own history and values in the mix.

The ASAM Criteria and Its Application in the ADIS Journal
Scott Covert, Vice President Early Intervention Services, The Change Companies
The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Criteria is recognized nationally as a dimensional assessment and treatment planning tool. Learn why the Washington Alcohol and Other Drug Information School is an ASAM 0.5 Early Intervention, and how the six dimensions are used in the ADIS curriculum.

Assessing and Treatment Planning for LGBTQ Clients
Donnie Goodman, MA/NCC LMHP, Deputy Director, Seattle Counseling Service
This session will focus on appropriate ways of assessing clients who identify as being part of the LBGTQ community with additional focus on appropriate treatment planning. Recognizing that every agency has different assessments and treatment plans, the focus will be helping your agency not only be culturally sensitive to the LGBT clients but also to be culturally appropriate and thorough in completing treatment plans or Individual Service Plans as they are now known in Washington.

Is Work Too Stressful? What About Long Term Unemployment!
Joseph Marrone, Senior Program Manager, Public Policy, ICI, UMass Boston; Melodie Pazolt, Supported Employment/Supportive Housing Program Administrator, Department of Social and Health Services, Behavioral Health Services Administration
This workshop will focus on the deleterious impact of long term unemployment on physical and mental health. It will also provide information on DBHRs current 5 year SAMHSA grant, which has a goal of expanding evidence based Supported Employment throughout the WA state system.

Creating Connections: “Everything I Wish My Therapist Knew About Foster Care”
Suzanne Kerns, PhD, Assoicate Professor, University of Washington; Barb Putnam, MSW, LICSW, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Children’s Administration
In response to a statewide survey of behavioral health providers about working with children and youth in foster care, we developed a curriculum that provides: 1) Information about the child welfare system and how this may interact with therapy; 2) Ideas and strategies for addressing the unique needs of children and youth in care – including how to effectively involve biological parents who may not have custody of their children at the time of treatment; and 3) Perspectives from parent allies (those who were successfully reunified with their children), youth alumni of foster care, and foster parents about effective treatment.

Accommodations To Community Mental Health Intakes For Persons With Intellectual Disabilities and Other Developmental Disabilities
Edward Fischer, PsyD, Developmental Disability Administration, Department of Social and Health Services
An introduction to dual diagnosis of mental health issues in persons with developmental disabilities.

Behavior 101 – Empowering Clients
Craig Peterson, Author, Adopting Faith: A Father’s Unconditional Love, Speaker Accompanied by Michael Peterson and Andrew Peterson
All behavior has meaning, yet oftentimes professionals and their clients (or family members) struggle to be on the same page. When this happens, successful outcomes are less likely. This session will share filmed vignettes from the clients’ perspective. Come to be inspired and learn the value of a connected message.

Assisted Outpatient Mental Health Treatment (House Bill1450)
Jewelya Ianniciello, CDP, LICSW, CIYT, CCTP, Mental Health Program Administrator, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery
This workshop will focus on Assisted Outpatient Treatment describing the details of the law: focusing on a person who has been committed by a court to detention for involuntary mental health treatment, is unlikely to voluntarily participate in outpatient treatment, is unable to survive safely in the community without supervision and would benefit from less restrictive alternative treatment to prevent a relapse, decomposition or deterioration.

Supported Employment for Individuals with Unique Needs
Megan Burr, MPA, Employment and Day Program Coordinator, Developmental Disabilities Administration, Department of Social and Health Services; Melodie Pazolt, Supported Employment/Supportive Housing Program Administrator, Department of Social and Health Services, Behavioral Health Services Administration
The workshop will cover the benefits of supported employment for individuals with co-occurring disorders.  The workshop will explore best practices in the field and highlight success stories.

Working With Trauma in Diverse Populations
Christen Kishel, PhD, Field Psychologist, Washington State Developmental Disabilities Administration
This workshop will provide the audience with a better understanding of and practical ideas for intervening with trauma in persons with developmental disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, fetal alcohol syndrome, and other disorders that impact communication and executive functioning. The audience will leave with a clear picture of how trauma affects the brain, how that is compounded in clients with developmental disabilities whose rates of victimization are higher than the average population, and strategies that can be implemented immediately to support anyone who has experienced trauma, regardless of their developmental level.

Motivational Interviewing and Its Application in ADIS Journals
Scott Covert, Vice President Early Intervention Services, The Change Companies
Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based approach to behavioral change and is integral to the Washington Alcohol and Other Drug Information School Journal. Learn how the spirit of MI is used in Interactive Journaling®, and how Journaling can support your Motivational Interviewing skills.

Supporting Clients with Traumatic Brain Injury
Ashley Minyard, Central Washington Resource Manager, Brain Injury Alliance of Washington
A focused presentation for professionals underlining the specifics of Brain Injury and its co-occurrence with other relevant disorders, highlighting the benefits of professional support, education, early intervention and communal support for both adult and pediatric clients.

Integrated Mental Health/Substance Treatment in the Real World
Paula Riggs, Professor and Director, Division of Substance Dependence, University of Colorado School of Medicine
Dr. Riggs will address practical and clinically feasible ways of applying research-based principles for integrating mental health/substance treatment.  She will also present an evidence-based, integrated mental health/substance treatment intervention, known as Encompass. The intervention utilizes individual motivational enhancement (MET)/cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and contingency management (CM) targeting substance use disorders. Dr. Riggs will also discuss how Encompass integrates assessment and treatment of co-occurring psychiatric disorders and will present pooled substance and mental health outcome data from three community-based and one school-based implementation sites.

16 Facts for Clinicians in the Era of Legal Cannabis
Jennifer Wyatt, LMHC, MT-BC, CDP, Training and Program Specialist, Northwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (NWATTC)
This presentation will share current information of interest to mental health and chemical dependency professionals working with youth and adult individuals. Topic include trends in cannabis use, evidence-based treatments for cannabis use disorders, association between cannabis use and mental health disorders, and research on medical marijuana. Links to multimedia resources, including videos and infographics, will be shared.

Supporting Sexuality Education for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
Britta Saltonstall, PhD, BCBA, Trainer & Consultant, Britta Saltonstall, LLC
Attendees will learn to a) recognize unique challenges, b) prioritize learning areas and c) identify resources for sexuality education from early childhood to young adulthood. Sexuality will be conceptualized as a component of healthy social development. This workshop provides specific direction in supporting positive sexual maturation for individuals with developmental disability, their service providers, families and classrooms.

Problem Gambling: 1 in 5
Kristin West, Outreach and Development Coordinator, Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling; Maureen Greeley, Executive Director, Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling
If you currently see clients for behavioral health or substance use, at least one in five of them may screen positively for gambling disorder. Problem gambling rarely acts alone: nearly 95% of those with the disorder also have at least one co-occurring disorder. Diagnosis and treatment of this hidden addiction is essential for a holistic treatment approach that aids long-term recovery. This workshop will cover risk factors, demographics affected, diagnostic tools, treatment methods (including innovations in therapeutic courts), and prevalence rates including the major co-occurring disorders.

Managing Substance Abusing Youth in the Juvenile Justice System
Fred Dyer, PhD, CADC, Dyer Consulting
This workshop addresses a distinct subgroup of adolescents with substance us disorders who come into contact with the juvenile justice system and whose substance use history patterns, co-occurring mental disorder and related needs are similar to those adolescents not involved in the juvenile justice system. This skill-building workshop will enable juvenile justice administrators, program managers, clinicians, substance abuse counselors and case managers to work more effectively with substance using youth in the juvenile justice system. 

Addressing Co-occurring Disorders Among Older Adults
W. Allen Hume, PhD, CDP, Consulting Psychologist, Private Practice
The workshop will include a statement of the problem, signs and symptoms of COD among older adults, and methods of assessment. In addition there will be an interactive empathy building exercise to better understand some of the physical changes that take place as we age. Finally, recommendations will be made regarding potential interventions. 

Motivational Interviewing in One Hour
David Jefferson, MSW, Community Health Analyst, Skagit County
Motivational interviewing is constantly changing and being shaped by research and practice. Learn the latest material published by Miller and Rollnick and other leading practitioners. Learn about the four phases of MI, the difference between sustain talk, change talk, and discord, and the importance of engagement to achieve better outcomes.

Treating the CD patient with Mental Health Symptoms: A Hands On Approach for Chemical Dependency (CD) Counselors
Samantha Carroll, BA, CDP, The Healing Lodge; Cara Strange, CDP, Pioneer Center East
Chemical Dependency (CD) and mental health issues are often times indistinguishable, yet CD counselors must walk a fine line when treating these patients. This workshop offers some tools and techniques for treating patients with mental health issues in the CD setting without practicing out of our scope. It will also help the CD counselor gain confidence in our very important role in the ever changing health care system.

Helping the Helper: Overview of the Washington Recovery and Monitoring Program (WRAMP) for Healthcare Professionals
Mikel Olsson, MS, MHP, CDP, Case Manager, Washington Recovery and Monitoring Program
What happens to healthcare professionals when substance use disorders impact their ability to practice? Who helps the helper? The Washington Recovery and Monitoring Program (WRAMP) is one of four programs administered through the Department of Health (DOH) providing a means for healthcare professionals impacted by substance use to return to practice through monitored recovery. WRAMP provides services to over 60 healthcare professions credentialed through DOH, including Chemical Dependency Professionals and Mental Health Counselors.

Experience the Transition
Clifford Thurston, Founder/CEO, Worldbridgers; Beth Hammonds, Regional Director to Washington and California, Recovery Innovations
Worldbridgers joins forces with Recovery Innovations and We will bring to you peer support system development updates and advances in local, national and global arenas. Join us for this immerse, enriching and interactive workshop experience.

How to Survive and Thrive Through a DBHR Review
Amie Roberts, LMHC, CPM, Mental Health Program Administrator, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Department of Social and Health Services; Gina Dick, LMHC, CDP, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Department of Social and Health Services
The review process can be a source of stress and anxiety unless you feel prepared and know what to expect. This presentation will teach you exactly what to expect, and you will leave knowing how to prepare for a successful review. A few tips and tricks will be shared, as well examples and templates for policies and procedures, quality management plans, measurable service goals, and corrective action plans.

Never GIVE UP – The Art of Encouragement
Carol Gartin, AAS, CPC, Licensed Counselor, Community Mental Healthcare Clinic
How to guide, support, evaluate and inspire others on their journeys through mental illness, addiction and trauma. There are key needs and supports that when addressed in a peer relationship can help someone step from being directionless and hopeless into having roads of opportunity.

Cultural Elements in Treating Hispanic and Latino Populations
Daniel Garcia, MSW, Northwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center; Janese Olalde, MEd, CADC II,CGAC II, Trainer, Northwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center
The goals of this workshop is to increase service providers’ cultural understanding and develop personal and professional clinical skills in working effectively with Latino clients. Participants will also be encouraged to consider approaches to providing services that are Latino sensitive.

MST (Multi-Systemic Therapy) –FIT (Family Integrated Transitions) Co-Occurring [Substance Abuse and Mental Health] Disorder Program
Jacob Towle, MPA, Program Administrator, WA State Department of Social and Health Services, Rehabilitation Administration’s Juvenile Rehabilitation; Elissa Russell, MEd, MST/Fit Supervisor, Central Washington Community Mental Health; Nicole McManus, MS, LMFT, CMHS
MST-FIT Supervisor, Community Psychiatric Clinic; Joshua Leblang, EdS, LMHC, LCPC, MST-FIT Expert
The Multi-Systemic Therapy–Family Integrated Transitions (MST–FIT) program provides integrated individual and family services to juvenile offenders who have co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders. Services are provided during a youth’s transition from juvenile rehabilitation incarceration back into the community. The overall goal of MST–FIT is to provide necessary treatment to youth, thereby reducing recidivism. The program also seeks to connect youth and their families to appropriate community supports, maintain and/or work toward substance abuse abstinence, stabilize and improve youth’s mental health, and increase youth pro-social behavior in their home community.

Rural Adolescents: Let’s Not Forget About Them
Fred Dyer, PhD, CADC, Dyer Consulting
Given the enormity and challenges of addressing alcohol and drug use and mental health problems of youth in rural areas, clinicians, public health specialists, mental health workers, school counselors, and teachers must understand the many factors that make providing substance prevention and treatment services in rural areas so difficult before delving into solutions. This workshop will describe many of those factors with corresponding solutions.

A Community Wide Approach to Addressing Over Utilization of the Emergency Department
Rebecca Grohs, RN, BSN, CCM, Clinical Director, Consistent Care
This workshop will review the development and operations of a community wide program aimed at addressing inappropriate use of the emergency department. Collaboration with community partners is key to addressing this difficult population. Attendees will learn about this evidence based program built upon a clinical trial completed in the Tri-Cities in 2014.

Collaborative Care Strategies
W. Allen Hume, PhD, CDP, Consulting Psychologist, Private Practice
Workshop will utilize the ASAM criteria as a guide to coordinate and collaborate care with other disciplines utilizing case examples, both provided by the presenter and participants. Specific recommendations will be provided and discussed.

Effective Techniques for Dealing with Highly Resistant Clients
Clifton Mitchell, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, International Clinical Trainer, Creator, Legal and Ethical Game Show Challenge, Author, Effective Techniques for Dealing with Highly Resistant Clients
*Please note this is a 3-hour workshop and will end at 4:45pm.
The successful management of resistance is the pivotal point of effective therapy. It is also a critical component in alleviating therapists’ stress. Although most therapists have been trained extensively in theoretical approaches, few have had extensive training in dealing with resistance. This is a fast paced, highly practical seminar designed to teach innovative approaches and ideas to prevent, avoid, and resolve resistance. These techniques are applicable across a wide array of clients and problems, and can be integrated with all theoretical approaches. Emphasis will be on “how to” aspects of resistance management, though the theory behind each approach is provided.

Specifically, this seminar will first present definitions and a model for resistance that empowers therapists in managing the problem. This is followed by a discussion of common mistakes therapists make that promote resistance and a discussion of the general principles for dealing with resistance. More specific approaches and techniques are then presented with particular attention given to utilizing the inherent power of language to circumvent resistance. Common client impasses such as “Yes, but…” responses will be addressed. Upon completion of the training, participants will have a broad array of techniques to add to their repertoire and to aid in reducing the stress that accompanies their most frustrating clients.

Practical issues in Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioids and Alcohol Disorders and Opioid Overdose Prevention
Richard Ries, MD, Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Washington, Director, Addictions Division, Harborview Medical Center; Andrew J. Saxon, MD, Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director, Addiction Psychiatry Residency Program, University of Washington, Director, Center of Excellence in Substance Abuse Treatment and Education (CESATE), VA Puget Sound Health Care System; Michelle Peavy, PhD, Evergreen Treatment Services
During this panel presentation, presenters will cover the following topics: the opioid overdose epidemic and what clinics, counselors, pharmacies and others can do about it; practical medication assisted treatments for opioid and alcohol addictions; case studies in integrated medication, behavioral and 12 step treatment; and Stump the Experts: Audience presented case studies for discussion by the presenters, above, with other audience participation.

Depression as Resistance to Treatment
Richard O’Connor, MSW, PhD, Private Practice
Depression, though a serious mind-brain-body problem of its own, is also frequently a symptom of other co-occurring disorders.  The hopelessness, distorted thinking, lack of energy, suppressed emotion, and interpersonal withdrawal that accompany depression represent difficult obstacles in the way of treatment.  This talk will first address the defensive purpose of these symptoms for the client, and with that understanding then focus on techniques to address these obstacles in the process of psychotherapy.